Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Job Opportunity: Life Sciences Licensing Associate

The CU Technology Transfer Office is seeking a Life Sciences Licensing Associate for its Anschutz Medical Campus office (Aurora, CO). The Licensing Associate has responsibility for the management and administration of a portfolio of intellectual property, which involves identifying, soliciting, and evaluating invention disclosures for patent and market potential, prioritizing investments in the portfolio, and negotiating and administering option and license agreements. Please review the full requirements - to apply, visit www.jobsatcu.com (posting #807777).

Tech Spotlight: Peptide-Based Vaccines for Influenza, SARS, HIV and Ebola Viruses

By studying the SARS virus, researchers led by Drs. Kathryn Holmes and Robert Hodges of the University of Colorado have developed a novel vaccine strategy that inhibits Type I viral infections with broad application for vaccines to other viruses of this group. The peptides used by Drs. Holmes and Hodges can be easily and rapidly synthesized, and can be used to prepare an active vaccine or a passive vaccine (antibody therapeutic) for humans.

While this technology was initially develop for the SARS epidemic, recent efforts have been directed at illustrating its efficacy with Influenza virus. Viral challenge experiments are currently in progress to demonstrate that this strategy will work to immunize against the flu virus - initial in vivo passive immunization data are positive, with final results expected in Summer 2009.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Monday, July 27, 2009

TechoShark Licenses CU Technology for Mobile Social Networking

Startup company launches iPhone app enabling location-aware social networking

BOULDER (July 27, 2009). The University of Colorado and TechoShark, Inc. recently executed an exclusive licensing agreement to develop and commercialize technology enabling mobile, location-aware social networking. The technology underlying hoozat, the iPhone application recently launched by TechoShark, was developed in the lab of Richard Han, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Available for download in the iPhone App Store, hoozat interacts with Facebook to allow users to both connect with friends and meet and learn about new people in real-time based on location. Han said the company plans to expand the location-based app to LinkedIn, Twitter, MySpace and other social networking sites in the near future. “Our goal is to be the premier mobile application for networking among people at social events,” said Han, president of TechoShark. “You’ll be able to immerse yourself into an event, whether you're there or not, and find out ‘who's at’ an event and what they're talking about. We like to think that our app puts the ‘face-to-face’ in Facebook.”

In January 2009 the company won a six-month, $100,000 Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Science Foundation to develop the technology platform into a preference-aware mobile application linking a user's location with coupons from local stores and restaurants. “We are happy to see this group of students become entrepreneurs along with Dr. Han,” added Kate Tallman, Director of Technology Transfer for CU-Boulder. “We hope to see the hoozat app make its way onto many iPhones.”

About hoozat and TechoShark
TechoShark’s hoozat application is the most efficient location-aware and context/preference-aware social and business networking program for mobile device users. It provides real-time, location-based social networking and business and marketing intelligence by leveraging existing third-party social networks and tools with a wide variety of functionalities. The application benefits business people and anyone interested in receiving pertinent, real-time social and business networking information through their mobile devices. www.hoozatapp.com

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Tech Spotlight: Power Optimal Attitude Control for Spacecraft

Dr. Hanspeter Schaub of the University of Colorado’s Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences has developed a method for power optimal attitude control for spacecraft. This method has the potential to reduce the amount of mechanical power and energy required by 10-20%, while only marginally increasing the average required torque. Dr. Schaub's method uses momentum wheels, or redundant clusters of reaction wheels that are commonly found in spacecraft.

This method has particular benefits for small satellites because they operate at much higher spin rates than those of a more typically sized spacecraft. Power is proportional to rotor speeds, and the amount of electrical power that a small satellite can produce is very limited due to heat and weight constraints of the battery or fuel source. This method also has benefits for larger spacecraft and space structures, in that equivalent energy usage savings can be achieved.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Friday, July 17, 2009

July 2009 Newsletter Now Available

Highlights from TTO's July 2009 newsletter:

ION Engineering Licenses CU Carbon-Capture Technology
TTO and ION Engineering, LLC have finalized an exclusive licensing agreement to develop and commercialize technology enabling efficient and economical capture of CO2 and other contaminants from natural gas wells and coal-fired power plant emissions. ION’s breakthrough technology, developed by CU-Boulder Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering researchers Jason Bara, Dean Camper, Richard Noble and Douglas Gin, is the first to successfully integrate ionic liquid solutions into carbon capture and emissions control technology. (See also: Five Questions for ION's CEO, Daily Camera; Chemicals To Help Coal Come Clean, Chemical Engineering News).

Illumasonix Licenses University of Colorado Blood Flow Visualization Technology

Illumasonix, LLC, an early-stage medical device company headquartered in Colorado, has executed an exclusive license with the University of Colorado (CU) for a non-invasive method to provide quantitative information on complex blood flow in the treatment of vascular disease. The technology being developed by Illumasonix was invented by Dr. Robin Shandas, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder and of Pediatrics and Cardiology at the University of Colorado Denver. It uses both ultrasound and FDA approved microbubbles to track blood flow, providing real-time assessment of blood flow and detecting blockages.

Software Company ASR to Develop CU Advanced Patient Care Software

Medical software company Analytical Research Systems, Inc. (ASR) and the University of Colorado announced that ASR has secured an exclusive license to advanced patient care software developed at the University of Colorado. The technology covered in the license agreement was developed and implemented by ASR President David Spiegel, a professor of medicine at the UC Denver Anschutz Medical Campus. ASR will use the licensed technology to further the development of its new electronic medical record product, asrSynapseTM, designed specifically for small-to-medium-sized independent physician practices as a convenient, cost-effective medical record solution.

Read the full newsletter
.

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Tech Spotlight: Synergistic Combination of HDAC Inhibitors for Treatment of Cancer

Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC inhibitors, HDI) are a class of compounds that block the activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC), a crucial part of the gene expression cycle within a cell. HDI’s have a long history of use in psychiatry and neurology as mood stabilizers and anti-epileptics, but so far just one HDI has been approved to treat cancer.

A research team led by Lia Gore and Deb DeRyckere at the University of Colorado has demonstrated a synergistic cell kill effect when a class I-specific HDI is used in combination with another, non-Class I-specific HDI. Using this approach, an HDI combination therapy would have greater efficacy and possibly fewer side effects than any HDI used alone as a cancer therapy.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, including a link to the relevant patent document, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Tech Spotlight: Efficient, Low-cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger

Heat exchangers transfer heat from one fluid to another (both liquids and gases are considered fluids). These devices are found in buildings, power plants, industrial processes, and renewable energy systems. Although microchannel heat exchangers (in which at least one fluid is confined to a channel less than 1mm) provide better heat exchange, resist pressure better, and are more compact, they are currently too expensive for most applications.

A University of Colorado research team has developed a new heat exchanger design and accompanying manufacturing technique for creating low-cost microchannel heat exchangers from plastics or metals. Optimization results for this device indicate that the new heat exchanger will not only be much more efficient, but will also be manufactured at a much lower cost.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, including links to relevant patent documents, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Monday, July 6, 2009

Software Company ASR to Develop CU Advanced Patient Care Software

AURORA (July 6, 2009). Medical software company Analytical Research Systems, Inc. (ASR) and the University of Colorado today announced that ASR has secured an exclusive license to advanced patient care software developed at the University of Colorado. The technology covered in the license agreement was developed and implemented by ASR President David Spiegel, a professor of medicine at the UC Denver Anschutz Medical Campus.

“Our goal is to advance the delivery of healthcare through the implementation of an advanced electronic health record that is affordable to small medical practices,” Spiegel stated. ASR will use the licensed technology to further the development of its new electronic medical record product, asrSynapseTM, designed specifically for small-to-medium-sized independent physician practices as a convenient, cost-effective medical record solution. This web-based, point-of-care tool will provide a longitudinal electronic health record for the care of patients with specific focus on primary care, internal medicine, and chronic disease management. Advanced informatics will provide quality data analysis, patient level and practice level alerts, and enhance practice efficiency.

“The CU Technology Transfer Office is excited about the opportunity of asrSynapseTM to generate impact in the medical records segment of the healthcare industry,” said David Allen, CU’s Associate Vice President for Technology Transfer. Allen added, “the national need is readily apparent and this development is another proof-point for CU’s relevance in healthcare delivery.”

About Analytical Systems Research, Inc.
Analytical Systems Research, Inc. (ASR) is a software development company seeking to provide patient management tools to the practicing physician. ASR seeks to offer the medical community a new approach to the EHR (Electronic Health Record) based on a web-based, point-of-care software. ASR is a privately-held company located in Englewood, CO. For further information, please visit www.asrSynapse.com.