Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Tech Spotlight: Detection of Nucleic Acid Hybridization Using Liquid Crystals

A CU research team has developed methods for detecting hybridization of nucleic acids using liquid crystals (LC) and cationic surfactant monolayers without the need for molecular labels and/or complex diagnostic equipment. While the system has not been optimized, University of Colorado researchers have demonstrated that the technology can differentiate a one base pair mismatch in a 16mer target at a sensitivity of 50 fmol. While this sensitivity cannot currently compete with that using standard fluorescence scanning, expensive equipment is not needed and thus would permit the adaptation for use in home, point-of-care, or field-based assays.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, including links to relevant patents and scientific publications, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Thursday, February 18, 2010

February 2010 Newsletter Now Available

Highlights from TTO's February 2010 newsletter:

Colorado Institute for Drug, Device and Diagnostic Development Launches with "Call for Proposals"
The Colorado Institute for Drug, Device and Diagnostic Development (CID4) launched this month with a statewide "Call for Proposals" from Colorado life science technologies in need of funding and active management. CID4 is a private, not-for-profit entity, formed in 2009 to bridge the gap between basic research and successful product commercialization, thereby creating more Colorado jobs in the life science industry.

Sundrop Has Hot Plans to Produce Energy
Louisville-based Sundrop Fuels says it has perfected a solar-energy technology capable of producing 100 million gallons of synthetic gasoline annually from corn stalks and wood chips. Sundrop Fuels acquired CU licensee Copernican Energy in 2008.

Read the full newsletter, or sign up to receive a monthly email update

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Tech Spotlight: Non-invasive Measurement of Esophageal Inflammation

A research team from the University of Colorado and The Children’s Hospital have developed a method for measuring esophageal inflammation in which a digestible capsule or other delivery system is swallowed, deploying a line into the esophagus. Along the line are located capture agents that bind a relevant diagnostic analyte. These capture agents could include monoclonal antibodies or eosinophil granule protein antibodies. After a predetermined period of time, the line is removed and analyzed for these diagnostic indicators, which can be any factor that indicates the presence or severity of inflammation of the esophagus.

This novel, non-invasive technique may be used to measure any cause of inflammation of the esophagus, and can be used to diagnose, monitor, or access the treatment of any disease or inflammation of the esophagus.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Tech Spotlight: Error Detecting/Correcting Barcodes for Simultaneous Characterization of Many Samples

A CU research group has developed an improved method for designing barcodes for use in high throughput sequencing, e.g. pyrosequencing. These barcodes, uniquely, can both detect and correct sequencing errors, thus allowing high-confidence sequencing of hundreds of samples in a single pyrosequencing run.

The technology has the potential to revolutionize several areas of research such as microbial community analysis, gene expression analysis, genomics, allele detection, diagnostic assays, and many other applications of high-throughput sequencing (especially as the read length improves and the number of sequences per plate increases). The improved barcodes will also make the technology far more accessible because many users can share a single run rather than paying for the full cost individually, thus allowing more labs to afford a taste of the technology for speculative but innovative research projects.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Fast Company: Why You Should Start a Company in... Boulder

In January, Fast Company published a vignette highlighting what makes Boulder attractive to entrepreneurs:
[T]he core personality in Boulder is an entrepreneurial personality. It's an independent, hippyish, smart, counterculture place. [...] [Y]ou have an acceptance in this community of both independent thought, as well as a very high comfort level with ambiguity and failure. So if it's not clear what you're doing, you're still very welcome here.
Read more here.

Tech Spotlight: Stimulation of Apoptosis using Novel Potent Tight Junction Protein Modulators

Pre-existing conventional methods for modulating tight junction proteins to date involve interaction of tight junction protein modulators with the extracellular portions of specific tight junction proteins. Dr. Margaret Neville and her CU research team have developed a novel peptide that targets and disrupts claudins, a family of tight junction proteins.

Increasing evidence indicates that the ability to resist apoptosis is the main cause of most, if not all, cancers. The ability to increase apoptosis through disruption of claudins will enable the development of treatments that increase the death of damaged cells in cancer patients, and prevent mutated tumor-promoting cells from entering the bloodstream. Specifically, the claudin disrupting peptide may have a great utility in skin and cutaneous disorders where tight junction disruption would have minimal system side effects. In addition, direct injection of claudin disrupting peptide into breast tissue may prove useful for treatment of cancerous tissue and/or removal of epithelial tissue that is susceptible to becoming cancerous, providing an alternative to mastectomy and current treatment options.

To read a non-confidential summary of this technology, including links to relevant patent documents and publications, please click the image above. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.

Monday, February 1, 2010

CU Technology Commercialization Highlighted in Denver Post

In a weekend 'guest commentary' piece in the Denver Post, Chancellor Philip DiStefano (CU-Boulder) advocated for prioritizing state funding to research universities:
We pioneer the research that develops vital technologies and procedures to protect the health of citizens here and across the world. In turn, these technologies result in companies that create Colorado jobs that help to secure our state's economic health.
DiStefano provided several examples of CU technologies having a real-world impact, including the FluChip flu diagnostic (licensed in some fields to InDevR) and a water-saving leaf sensor (licensed to AgriHouse).