Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Tech Spotlight: Novel Microfluidic Biodetection Platform for Equipment-Free Field Diagnostics

The ever-growing need for medical diagnostic systems in resource-limited settings is driving the development of microfluidic detection platforms. The advantages conferred by microfluidic platforms compared with their macro-scale counterparts include: lower analyte volumes, decreased reagent cost and rapid diffusion and adsorption times. Simple, standalone modes of detection for point-of-care diagnostics, particularly in resource-limited areas such as 2nd and 3rd world countries, is an area of high unmet need which micro-fluidic immunoassays can potentially fulfill; their lower analyte volumes greatly reduce the need for sterile collection materials and substantially decrease the production of biologically contaminated waste.

A research team led by Christopher Bowman of the University of Colorado has developed a novel microfluidic detection platform that utilizes polymerization-based amplification (PBA) as a means for simple detection in microfluidic systems. This capillary flow device allows for multiple modes of detection requiring little or no supplemental instrumentation (visual observation, pressure monitoring, or by redirection of fluid flow). The rapid, equipment- free nature of this approach is promising for potential deployment of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings.

To learn more, please click the image above for a non-confidential summary of this technology, or go directly to the key scientific publication. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site. 

Monday, August 27, 2012

Podcast: Technology Transfer Flows with the Innovation Economy

W3W3 radio spoke with TTO head David Allen about TTO's performance in fiscal year 2011-12, and over the past decade -listen to the podcast, or view an archive of all TTO podcasts. A short presentation giving highlights of FY2011-12 is available in PDF format here.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

TTO Head David Allen to Direct Tech Launch Arizona

David N. Allen, CU Associate Vice President for Technology Transfer, is leaving the University of Colorado to become the executive director of Tech Launch Arizona (TLA), the new technology commercialization center formed at the University of Arizona. Allen will report to University President Ann Weaver Hart as part of her cabinet. TLA includes the offices of technology transfer, corporate and business relations, as well as several business incubators and an extensive research park. Allen will assume TLA duties in Tucson on September 4, 2012.

Allen has headed the CU Technology Transfer Office since 2002, when he implemented a strategic plan designed to grow CU's pipeline of commercially-relevant technologies, establish best practices for licensing congruent with CU's national stature as a research institution, and achieve financial self-sustainability of the CU technology transfer operation. Says Allen: "My decade in Colorado was productive and enjoyable, and I'm confident that TTO staff will continue to deliver great service to CU faculty inventors and the business community."

See also:

August 2012 Newsletter Now Available

Top stories from TTO's August newsletter:

TTO Head David Allen to Direct Tech Launch Arizona
David N. Allen, CU Associate Vice President for Technology Transfer,is leaving the University of Colorado to become the executive director of Tech Launch Arizona (TLA), the new technology commercialization center formed at the University of Arizona.

Now Available: FY2011-12 Performance Overview

Viral Genetics Begins Phase 1 Clinical Trial for Ovarian Cancer
The first patient has now been enrolled into the Phase 1 clinical trial sponsored by CU licensee Viral Genetics and supported by a donation from Scott and White Foundation. The trial will study Metabolic Disruption Technology (MDT) compounds in combination with an existing cancer therapy to treat drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

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CU TTO Reports Performance Metrics for FY2011-12

TTO has released its performance metrics for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012. Please follow this link to a short presentation summarizing our performance, and look for our full annual report in September 2012.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Tech Spotlight: Protein-resistant Polymers for Advanced Biomaterials

The non-specific adsorption and accumulation of proteins on surfaces, or protein fouling, is a chronic problem that affects many fields. One area where fouling remains a problem is in membrane-based water filtration systems. The accumulation of proteins and related biofilms on porous membranes leads to a rapid decrease in water flux, operating performance, and lifetime, which mandate regular membrane replacement or cleaning. Such adverse effects are especially important in the performance of membrane- based water reclamation systems such as membrane bioreactors.

A CU research group led by Douglas Gin, in collaboration with the University of Texas, has discovered a new type of functional polymer membrane coating that resists fouling. By cross-linking quaternary phosphonium- and ammonium-based polymer coatings, the researchers have developed polymers that exhibit protein-adsorption resistance properties on par with, or better than, polymers containing poly(ethylene oxide), which is the current benchmark functional group for protein-resistant coatings. The new protein-resistant polymer functional groups are readily synthesized, water-compatible, and chemically stable with respect to hydrolysis, acid attack, base attack, oxidation, and reduction. Although these new coating materials have most relevance in the context of protecting water filtration membranes against protein accumulation, they can also be applied to other types of materials in contact with protein-contaminated water to resist protein adsorption and have possible applications in the biomedical industry as well.

To learn more, please click the image above for a non-confidential summary of this technology, or go directly to the relevant patent application. For more CU technologies available for licensing, please visit our Tech Explorer site.